News & Updates

Browse our latest news

Foreign Worker to Permanent Resident (Alberta)

  • Thu, Jun 20, 2013

Copy Of Foreign Worker to Permanent Resident (Alberta)

Effective immediately, the AINP has opened a new category under the Strategic Recruitment Stream (SRS) to help foreign workers with the skills needed in Alberta to stay permanently and keep our economy growing. The Alberta Work Experience Category enables eligible workers with at least two years of Alberta work experience in key in-demand occupations to apply to nominate themselves for permanent residence. This new category is taking applications until November 28, 2013.

Source of this information: http://www.albertacanada.com/immigration/immigrating/ainp-news.aspx

  • Thu, Jun 20, 2013

Changes to Temporary Foreign Worker Program Expected Today

Source: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) Website:

Link: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2013/04/29/pol-temp-foreign-workers-changes.html

The federal government is expected to announce details today of changes to the temporary foreign workers program that will require employers to do more to find Canadian workers so they don't have to look elsewhere.

The expected changes come after a CBC Go Public story earlier this month on use of foreign workers by Royal Bank which sparked public outrage and brought renewed focus on the temporary foreign workers program. The controversy dominated Parliament Hill and had the government defending the program but also promising changes to it so that it is not abused.

One of the reforms expected is that employers will have to demonstrate that they have a plan to recruit, train and hire Canadians first before they can be granted a permit to hire foreign workers. If they have to hire foreign workers they will then need to have a plan to show how they will eventually hire Canadians for those positions.

Another change to the program will be a fee imposed on employers who want to hire temporary foreign workers.

There could also be changes to the current rule that allows for some temporary foreign workers to be paid 15 per cent less than Canadians.

Citizenship and Immigration Minister Jason Kenney and Human Resources Minister Diane Finley are expected to announce the changes late Monday afternoon in Ottawa.

The government said in its March budget that it would make reforms to the program, and they are expected to be included in the government's budget implementation bill that is on notice. It could be introduced after question period in the House of Commons today.

Finley's department oversees the program and issues labour market opinions (LMO) on how hiring foreign workers would impact the Canadian job market. Employers are only given permission to hire temporary foreign workers if they can't find Canadians to fill the jobs and only if bringing in foreign workers won't have a negative impact on the Canadian labour market.

To receive a positive LMO employers have to show what efforts they have made to recruit and train Canadian residents and the potential benefits that hiring foreign workers could have on the Canadian economy. Some work categories are exempt from the LMO requirement. Professionals and business people, for example, who come to Canada as part of international agreements or workers who come as part of an exchange program, do not need a LMO.

The total number of temporary foreign workers has doubled in the last decade, to 338,189 workers.

Some labour economists have been calling for a review of the program to determine if it is adequately addressing labour shortages or whether it is undermining wages and job opportunities in Canada.

Erin Weir, a labour economist with the United Steel Workers Union said in an interview earlier this month that some companies go through the motions of pretending to hire Canadians in order to get a positive labour market opinion.

  • Mon, Apr 29, 2013

Changes to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program Unveiled

Source: CBC

Website: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2013/04/29/pol-temp-foreign-workers-changes.html

Citizenship and Immigration Minister Jason Kenney defended the temporary foreign worker program as he unveiled changes to it Monday that include imposing a new fee on employers who want to bring workers in from outside Canada.

The amount of the fee is yet to be determined, Kenney said at a news conference in Ottawa.

The expected changes came after a CBC Go Public story earlier this month on use of foreign workers by Royal Bank which sparked public outrage and brought renewed focus on the temporary foreign workers program. The controversy dominated Parliament Hill and had the government defending the program but also promising changes to it so that it is not abused.

One of the reforms expected is that employers will have to demonstrate that they have a plan to recruit, train and hire Canadians first before they can be granted a permit to hire foreign workers. If they have to hire foreign workers they will then need to have a plan to show how they will eventually hire Canadians for those positions.

Another change to the program will be a fee imposed on employers who want to hire temporary foreign workers.

Insiders say Canada 'scammed' by foreign worker industry

There could also be changes to the current rule that allows for some temporary foreign workers to be paid up to15 per cent less than the median wage paid to Canadians in the same occupation.

Employers, however, must offer foreign workers the same wage that is paid to Canadian workers in the same job in the same geographic area.

Citizenship and Immigration Minister Jason Kenney and Kellie Leitch, parliamentary secretary to Human Resources Minister Diane Finley will announce the changes in Ottawa. Finley was expected to attend the news conference but had a last minute scheduling change.

The government said in its March budget that it would make reforms to the program, and they are expected to be included in the government's budget implementation bill that is on notice. It could be introduced after question period in the House of Commons today.

Finley's department oversees the program and issues labour market opinions (LMO) on how hiring foreign workers would impact the Canadian job market. Employers are only given permission to hire temporary foreign workers if they can't find Canadians to fill the jobs and only if bringing in foreign workers won't have a negative impact on the Canadian labour market.

To receive a positive LMO employers have to show what efforts they have made to recruit and train Canadian residents and the potential benefits that hiring foreign workers could have on the Canadian economy. Some work categories are exempt from the LMO requirement. Professionals and business people, for example, who come to Canada as part of international agreements or workers who come as part of an exchange program, do not need a LMO.

The total number of temporary foreign workers has doubled in the last decade, to 338,189 workers.

Some labour economists have been calling for a review of the program to determine if it is adequately addressing labour shortages or whether it is undermining wages and job opportunities in Canada.

Erin Weir, a labour economist with the United Steel Workers Union said in an interview earlier this month that some companies go through the motions of pretending to hire Canadians in order to get a positive labour market opinion.

The Alberta Federation of Labour said Monday that the program is being abused and employers are using it as a first choice instead of a last resort.

"Nowhere in the country is the situation more serious than in Alberta where clearly the temporary foreign worker program is being used to displace Canadians and to set off a race to the bottom in terms of wages and conditions," said Gil McGown, the group's president.

McGowan said at a news conference on Parliament Hill that the program is driving down wages and "giving employers an excuse to abdicate their responsibility to train the next generation of Canadians."

McGowan said his group is not reassured by the initiatives being announced Monday and that the government is just trying to give the appearance that it is doing something to respond to public opinion.

  • Mon, Apr 29, 2013

Why Recruiters are So Important!

Source: http://www.inc.com/vanessa-merit-nornberg/recruiters-worth-money.html?goback=.gde_3862249_member_224660839&buffer_share=68ce

These Days, Recruiters Are Worth the Money
When it comes to sourcing the right interview candidates, I've never been keen to use recruiters. But I recently changed my mind.

My company, Metal Mafia, has an excellent candidate screening process, a super training program, and a very successful team of employees to show for it.

But hiring has always been a difficult task for me because each time I get ready to hire, it takes me forever to find the right type of candidates to even get the screening process started.

Despite the fact that I carefully consider where to advertise for candidates--I try to maximize the search dollars and get a good mix of potential applicants--it always takes me a long time to find people suited well to the company, and therefore, even worth interviewing.

I've tried everything from placing ads on large job boards like Monster.com, to smaller specialized job boards that cater to sales hires or fashion jobs, to local university boards where I can post for free (or close to it). Each time, I experience the same slow crawl toward finally finding the right person. It has taken me up to five months to find the right kind of hire in the past. So in November when I decided I needed to think about hiring for the new year, I was not optimistic.

For me, recruiters have traditionally been out of the question because I figured they would be a waste of time and never be as good at sending me the right people for the job as I would be in reviewing resumes myself. They're also too expensive for my small budget. But as I got ready to place my job ads again, one of my senior staff members came to me and offered me the name of a fashion recruiter she knew and thought could help. I was skeptical, but I called her anyway, figuring listening would cost me nothing.

The recruiter convinced me she would do a thorough job, but I still hesitated because of the price. I do not have large sums of money to devote to the hiring process, and by my calculations, when all was said and done, using the recruiter was going to cost me three times as much as my usual techniques. On the other hand, the recruiter would only charge me if she found someone I decided to hire, which meant I was risking nothing, and could always come back to my original methods. I bit the bullet and signed up, reminding myself "nothing ventured, nothing gained."

The recruiter sent me the resumes of 10 entry-level candidates. I screened six by phone, met three in person, and found the right hire--all in a month. The cost suddenly became much less, because I saved so much time in the process, and because I got a pool of applicants who were decidedly better to choose from than in the past. Even more interesting, perhaps, was an insight the right candidate shared with me during the interview process. When I asked why she had chosen to work with a recruiter rather than post on job boards, she said "because recruiters make sure your resume gets seen, while submitting via the Internet is like sending your resume into oblivion."

If most people these days are thinking like my new hire, the recruiters will clearly have the best selection of candidates every time. Looks like I've got an essential new hiring strategy.

  • Mon, Apr 29, 2013

Information for Applicants to the New Federal Skilled Worker Program

Source of the article: CIC website http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/department/media/backgrounders/2013/2013-04-18.asp

The Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP) selects immigrants based on their ability to succeed economically in Canada. After meeting eligibility requirements, applicants are assessed against selection criteria, also known as the "points grid." There are 100 points available to applicants, with points awarded for official language abilities, age, education, work experience, employment already arranged in Canada, and adaptability. The current pass mark is 67.

After a thorough review of relevant research, an extensive program evaluation, stakeholder and public consultations, research and study of best practices in other immigrant-receiving countries, improvements to the FSWP were announced in December 2012. These improvements will come into force on May 4, 2013.

A pause on the intake of most new FSWP applications has been in place since July 1, 2012, except for those with a qualifying job offer and those who applying under the PhD stream. The pause will be lifted and an eligible occupations stream re-established on May 4, 2013.

While Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) will not be accepting applications for the 24 eligible occupations until May 4, 2013, there are some new requirements that applicants can start preparing for, such as language tests and foreign educational credential assessments. The complete application process, featuring the new selection criteria, will be available on CIC's website by May 4, 2013.

All individuals who are considering applying on or after May 4 should be aware that if their application does not meet the new criteria, it will not be processed. A prospective applicant should ensure they meet at least one of the following requirements:

They have at least one year of continuous work experience in one of the 24 eligible occupations;They have a qualifying offer of arranged employment (*note changes to the arranged employment process were previously published in this web notice); orThey are eligible to apply through the PhD stream.

If prospective applicants are confident that they meet at least one of the above requirements, they must also meet the minimum language threshold and obtain an educational credential assessment (if submitting a foreign educational credential).

Eligible Occupations List

The eligible occupations stream will have an overall cap of 5,000 new applications and sub-caps of 300 applications in each of the 24 occupations on the list.

Eligible occupations (with their corresponding 2011 National Occupation Classification code):

  1. 0211 Engineering managers
  2. 1112 Financial and investment analysts
  3. 2113 Geoscientists and oceanographers
  4. 2131 Civil engineers
  5. 2132 Mechanical engineers
  6. 2134 Chemical engineers
  7. 2143 Mining engineers
  8. 2144 Geological engineers
  9. 2145 Petroleum engineers
  10. 2146 Aerospace engineers
  11. 2147 Computer engineers (except software engineers/designers)
  12. 2154 Land surveyors
  13. 2174 Computer programmers and interactive media developers
  14. 2243 Industrial instrument technicians and mechanics
  15. 2263 Inspectors in public and environmental health and occupational health and safety
  16. 3141 Audiologists and speech-language pathologists
  17. 3142 Physiotherapists
  18. 3143 Occupational Therapists
  19. 3211 Medical laboratory technologists
  20. 3212 Medical laboratory technicians and pathologists' assistants
  21. 3214 Respiratory therapists, clinical perfusionists and cardiopulmonary technologists
  22. 3215 Medical radiation technologists
  23. 3216 Medical sonographers
  24. 3217 Cardiology technicians and electrophysiological diagnostic technologists, n.e.c. (not elsewhere classified)

Minimum Language Threshold

All prospective applicants to the FSWP should first determine whether they meet the new minimum language threshold: Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) 7 or Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens (NCLC) 7 in all four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). To prove language proficiency, a prospective applicant must take a third-party language test from an organization designated by the Minister and submit their test report along with their application to CIC.

Language test results will be accepted by CIC for two years from the date that they were issued by the designated organization.

CIC-designated language testing organizations include: Canadian English Language Proficiency Index Program (CELPIP), International English Language Testing System (IELTS), and Test d'évaluation de français (TEF).

Third-party language tests are scored differently by each of the three organizations. Here are the scores on each of the tests that correspond to Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) 7 or Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens (NCLC) 7 or higher:

English

Canadian English Language Proficiency Index Program (CELPIP)

An FSWP applicant must score at least 4L on the CELPIP-General test in each of the four skills to meet the minimum language threshold.

A score of 4L on the CELPIP-General test corresponds to CLB 7. A score of 4H corresponds to CLB 8, and a score of 5 or higher corresponds to CLB 9 or higher.

International English Language Testing System (IELTS)

An FSWP applicant must score at least 6.0 on the IELTS General Training test in each of the four skills to meet the minimum language threshold of CLB 7.

French

Test d'évaluation de français (TEF)

An FSWP applicant must score at least 206 in reading, 248 in listening, and 309 in both speaking and writing on the TEF to meet the minimum language threshold of NCLC 7.

Arranged Employment

Previously, employers have applied for an Arranged Employment Opinion (AEO) from Human Resources Skills Development Canada when they wished to hire a foreign national on a permanent, full-time basis and support their employee's application for permanent residence through the FSWP.

Starting on May 4, 2013, CIC will no longer accept AEOs in support of an FSWP application. Instead, most offers of arranged employment will require a Labour Market Opinion.

Educational Credential Assessment (ECA)

Another important change that takes effect on May 4, 2013, is the introduction of the educational credential assessment (ECA). Prospective applicants may start the process of getting an ECA before May 4 if they are planning to submit a foreign educational credential. However, applicants should keep in mind the other program eligibility requirements listed above, i.e. whether they have a qualifying offer of arranged employment or are applying under the PhD stream or eligible occupations stream; and if they meet the minimum language threshold through a designated third-party test. Applicants who have Canadian educational credentials do not need to get an ECA, unless they are also submitting a foreign educational credential in support of their application.

The ECA process will help determine if the foreign educational credential is authentic and equivalent to a completed credential in Canada. For prospective applicants, the ECA can provide a realistic understanding of how their foreign educational credentials are likely to be recognized in Canada.

As of April 17, 2013, four organizations have been designated by the Minister to provide ECA reports for purposes of immigrating to Canada under the FSWP. Additional organizations may be designated by CIC in the future. The designated organizations are:

Comparative Education Service: University of Toronto School of Continuing Studies;International Credential Assessment Service of Canada;World Education Services; and,Medical Council of Canada.

The Medical Council of Canada has been designated only for those principal applicants who intend to apply with specialist physician (2011 National Occupation Classification [NOC] code 3111) or general practitioner/family physician (2011 NOC code 3112) as their primary occupation in their FSWP application. Neither NOC code 3111 nor 3112 is on the eligible occupations list that takes effect on May 4, so this will only affect those applying under the PhD stream or with a qualifying job offer based on those NOC codes.

Applicants should contact the designated organizations directly for further information on their documentation requirements, processing times and fees.

CIC will only accept ECA reports issued after the date the organization was designated by CIC to provide ECA reports for immigration purposes (i.e. April 17, 2013). An ECA report will be valid for immigration purposes for 5 years from the date that it was issued by the designated organization.

IMPORTANT NOTE: CIC will update application kits and web materials before the new FSWP is launched on May 4, 2013. Prospective applicants who wish to get a head start on their application can proceed with the steps and information outlined above but should check the CIC website for new FSWP application forms.

  • Fri, Apr 26, 2013

New Federal Skilled Workers Program

News Release — List of Priority Occupations and Organizations Designated to Conduct Educational Credential Assessments for Federal Skilled Worker Program Released.

From: Citizenship and Immigration Canada website : <http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/department/media/releases/2013/2013-04-18.asp>

Ottawa, April 18, 2013 —The list of 24 occupations that are eligible under the Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP) when it re-opens on May 4, 2013 was released today.

In addition, four organizations have been designated to provide the now-required independent third party assessments of foreign educational credentials for applicants who studied outside of Canada. These assessments, which must be completed before an application is submitted, are aimed at helping newcomers through the FSWP to get off to a better start and into the Canadian labour force more quickly when they arrive.

"The government's focus remains on jobs, economic growth, and long-term prosperity," said Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism Minister Kenney. "Under the new Federal Skilled Worker Program, Canada will be able to attract the skilled immigrants our economy requires, who are the most likely to succeed and contribute their full skill set to the Canadian economy."

With the re-opening date approaching, future applicants should be aware of several key elements that will have an effect on the application process:

•A new eligible occupations list, with a total of 24 occupations;
•An overall cap of 5,000 new applications for all eligible occupations, including a sub-cap of 300 new applications for each eligible occupation;
•Four organizations have been designated to conduct educational credential assessments (mandatory for applicants submitting foreign educational credentials); and
•Applicants must show proof that they meet the minimum threshold of Canadian Language Benchmark 7 in all four language skill areas: speaking, reading, writing and oral comprehension.
"As a result of the actions taken by the Government to deal with the massive backlogs and unacceptably long wait times, FSW applications will be processed in approximately one year," said Minister Kenney. "We will not be able to remain competitive and attract the skilled immigrants we need if we allow backlogs and wait times to grow again. That's why we are capping application intake and focusing on specific occupations that are experiencing labour shortages in Canada. This will also help us transition nicely into the just-in-time immigration system of the future."

Applications under the new FSWP will be accepted starting May 4, 2013. Until then, however, the FSWP application process does not change – only individuals with qualifying job offers or those applying under the PhD stream are eligible for processing.

All applicants who are considering applying on or after May 4 are invited to consult the Backgrounder. It outlines some of the steps that can be taken now to prepare and includes the eligible occupations list and the organizations designated to conduct educational credential assessments.

Backgrounder: Information for Applicants to the New Federal Skilled Worker Program

n designated to provide the now-required independent third party assessments of foreign educational credentials for applicants who studied outside of Canada. These assessments, which must be completed before an application is submitted, are aimed at helping newcomers through the FSWP to get off to a better start and into the Canadian labour force more quickly when they arrive.

"The government's focus remains on jobs, economic growth, and long-term prosperity," said Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism Minister Kenney. "Under the new Federal Skilled Worker Program, Canada will be able to attract the skilled immigrants our economy requires, who are the most likely to succeed and contribute their full skill set to the Canadian economy."

With the re-opening date approaching, future applicants should be aware of several key elements that will have an effect on the application process:

•A new eligible occupations list, with a total of 24 occupations;
•An overall cap of 5,000 new applications for all eligible occupations, including a sub-cap of 300 new applications for each eligible occupation;
•Four organizations have been designated to conduct educational credential assessments (mandatory for applicants submitting foreign educational credentials); and
•Applicants must show proof that they meet the minimum threshold of Canadian Language Benchmark 7 in all four language skill areas: speaking, reading, writing and oral comprehension.
"As a result of the actions taken by the Government to deal with the massive backlogs and unacceptably long wait times, FSW applications will be processed in approximately one year," said Minister Kenney. "We will not be able to remain competitive and attract the skilled immigrants we need if we allow backlogs and wait times to grow again. That's why we are capping application intake and focusing on specific occupations that are experiencing labour shortages in Canada. This will also help us transition nicely into the just-in-time immigration system of the future."

Applications under the new FSWP will be accepted starting May 4, 2013. Until then, however, the FSWP application process does not change – only individuals with qualifying job offers or those applying under the PhD stream are eligible for processing.

All applicants who are considering applying on or after May 4 are invited to consult the Backgrounder. It outlines some of the steps that can be taken now to prepare and includes the eligible occupations list and the organizations designated to conduct educational credential assessments.

Group A – Jobs with sub-caps of 100 applications each (and their corresponding 2011 NOC code)

  1. •7202 Contractors and supervisors, electrical trades and telecommunications occupations
  2. •7204 Contractors and supervisors, carpentry trades
  3. •7205 Contractors and supervisors, other construction trades, installers, repairers and servicers
  4. •7271 Carpenters
  5. •7301 Contractors and supervisors, mechanic trades
  6. •7302 Contractors and supervisors, heavy equipment operator crews
  7. •8211 Supervisors, logging and forestry
  8. •8221 Supervisors, mining and quarrying
  9. •8222 Contractors and supervisors, oil and gas drilling services
  10. •8241 Logging machinery operators
  11. •8252 Agricultural service contractors, farm supervisors and specialized livestock workers
  12. •9211 Supervisors, mineral and metal processing
  13. •9212 Supervisors, petroleum, gas and chemical processing and utilities
  14. •9214 Supervisors, plastic and rubber products manufacturing
  15. •9231 Central control and process operators, mineral and metal processing
  16. •9241 Power engineers and power systems operators
  17. •9243 Water and waste treatment plant operators

Group B – no sub-caps (2011 NOC code)

  1. •7231 Machinists and machining and tooling inspectors
  2. •7233 Sheet metal workers
  3. •7235 Structural metal and plate work fabricators and fitters
  4. •7236 Ironworkers
  5. •7237 Welders and related machine operators
  6. •7241 Electricians (except industrial and power system)
  7. •7242 Industrial electricians
  8. •7243 Power system electricians
  9. •7244 Electrical power line and cable workers
  10. •7245 Telecommunications line and cable workers
  11. •7246 Telecommunications installation and repair workers
  12. •7251 Plumbers
  13. •7252 Steamfitters, pipefitters and sprinkler system installers
  14. •7253 Gas fitters
  15. •7311 Construction millwrights and industrial mechanics
  16. •7312 Heavy-duty equipment mechanics
  17. •7313 Refrigeration and air conditioning mechanics
  18. •7314 Railway carmen/women
  19. •7315 Aircraft mechanics and aircraft inspectors
  20. •7318 Elevator constructors and mechanics
  21. •7371 Crane operators
  22. •7372 Drillers and blasters - surface, mining, quarrying and construction
  23. •7373 Water well drillers
  24. •8231 Underground production and development miners
  25. •8232 Oil and gas well drillers, servicers, testers and related workers
  26. •9232 Petroleum, gas and chemical process operators

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/department/media/backgrounders/2013/2013-04-18.asp

  • Thu, Apr 25, 2013

Another news title

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nulla pulvinar fringilla augue, vel consectetur eros lacinia eget. Mauris in tincidunt urna. Maecenas et libero nisi. Nulla scelerisque erat vitae lorem euismod vehicula. Morbi volutpat iaculis quam, vitae euismod arcu adipiscing vel. Suspendisse ut tellus lacus. Vivamus felis dui, dictum ut vehicula in, pulvinar at ligula. Suspendisse potenti. Donec venenatis risus sapien, et facilisis leo. Integer sollicitudin dapibus sapien at imperdiet. Sed urna ante, sodales sed lacinia sit amet, tristique at nulla. Aenean imperdiet aliquet varius. Nunc libero arcu, accumsan at ultrices congue, posuere ac erat. Nulla facilisi. Ut eget diam sit amet justo fringilla rutrum.

Nunc ut dolor nulla. Duis id metus at erat malesuada congue sit amet sit amet elit. Aenean orci orci, pulvinar ac aliquam et, hendrerit et purus. Sed fringilla, ante eget eleifend scelerisque, augue nunc consequat eros, ac euismod sapien odio eu quam. Curabitur varius felis at lorem congue ac congue felis bibendum. Ut gravida semper elementum. Aenean pretium, nisi id tempus pellentesque, arcu arcu porta nibh, non pharetra urna diam nec diam. Nam sed libero nec dui fringilla aliquam ac a diam. Fusce accumsan venenatis ultrices.

  • Thu, Dec 20, 2012

Welcome to my Premium Staffing Ltd new website!

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nulla pulvinar fringilla augue, vel consectetur eros lacinia eget. Mauris in tincidunt urna. Maecenas et libero nisi. Nulla scelerisque erat vitae lorem euismod vehicula. Morbi volutpat iaculis quam, vitae euismod arcu adipiscing vel. Suspendisse ut tellus lacus. Vivamus felis dui, dictum ut vehicula in, pulvinar at ligula. Suspendisse potenti. Donec venenatis risus sapien, et facilisis leo. Integer sollicitudin dapibus sapien at imperdiet. Sed urna ante, sodales sed lacinia sit amet, tristique at nulla. Aenean imperdiet aliquet varius. Nunc libero arcu, accumsan at ultrices congue, posuere ac erat. Nulla facilisi. Ut eget diam sit amet justo fringilla rutrum.

Nunc ut dolor nulla. Duis id metus at erat malesuada congue sit amet sit amet elit. Aenean orci orci, pulvinar ac aliquam et, hendrerit et purus. Sed fringilla, ante eget eleifend scelerisque, augue nunc consequat eros, ac euismod sapien odio eu quam. Curabitur varius felis at lorem congue ac congue felis bibendum. Ut gravida semper elementum. Aenean pretium, nisi id tempus pellentesque, arcu arcu porta nibh, non pharetra urna diam nec diam. Nam sed libero nec dui fringilla aliquam ac a diam. Fusce accumsan venenatis ultrices.

  • Thu, Nov 22, 2012